Obsessed with the future of TV

This is a notebook about television, internet video, and what the next living room will be. It's an outline powered by Fargo. The editor of Glass is Zach Seward; the lead developer is Sam Williams.

The name is an argument: that media are best understood as competition for attention on screens connected to the internet. Phones, tablets, laptops, monitors, television sets—it's all just glass.

  • Google, the internet provider, says it doesn't and won't charge for interconnection with content companies.
      • The Google Fiber blog took a moment to point this out today.
      • We give companies like Netflix and Akamai free access to space and power in our facilities and they provide their own content servers. We don’t make money from peering or colocation; since people usually only stream one video at a time, video traffic doesn’t bog down or change the way we manage our network in any meaningful way — so why not help enable it?
      • But we also don’t charge because it’s really a win-win-win situation. It’s good for content providers because they can deliver really high-quality streaming video to their customers. For example, because Netflix colocated their servers along our network, their customers can access full 1080p HD and, for those who own a 4K TV, Netflix in Ultra HD 4K. It’s good for us because it saves us money (it’s easier to transport video traffic from a local server than it is to transport it thousands of miles). But most importantly, we do this because it gives Fiber users the fastest, most direct route to their content. That way, you can access your favorite shows faster. All-in-all, these arrangements help you experience the best access to content on the Internet — which is the whole point of getting Fiber to begin with!
      • Of course, Google is also a content provider, through YouTube and other properties, so it sees this issue from that perspective as much as anything.
  • Wednesday 5.21.14